Find the Letter Alphabet Pages – Fun and Easy ABC Learning for Kids

Find the Letter Alphabet Pages – Fun and Easy ABC Learning for Kids

We just added something new to the subscriber resource library! Have you ever wondered how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet in a fun, natural way?  Find the Letter Alphabet Pages are the answer. They are a great way to make ABC Learning for kids easy and fun.

This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through an affiliate link, A Family of Readers earns a small commission.

These Find the Letter Alphabet Pages pages are simple, yet versatile and powerful. There’s a page for each letter A through Z. Each page has the featured letter in lowercase and uppercase, mixed in with other letters.

If you want to use the pages more than once, you can laminate them, or slip them into a clear plastic sleeve. Then, your child can write on them with dry erase markers or crayons. Erasing the crayon does require a bit more elbow grease, but its entirely do-able.

Depending on your child’s age and stage of reading development, choose from the following activities, or make up your own!

  • Find the featured letter in lowercase and cross it out or cover it up with a small “counter” object such as a pom-pom.
  • Find the featured letter in uppercase and cross it out or cover it up.
  • Find the featured letter in both lowercase and uppercase and cross it out or cover it up.
  • Find ALL the lowercase letters on a page.
  • Find ALL the uppercase letters on a page.
  • “Read” the page by pointing to each letter and saying its name. This is a great opportunity for your child to practice tracking from left to right.
  • Point to each letter and say its sound.
  • Point to each letter and say its name, its sound, and a word that starts with that letter.
  • Play “I Spy” with your child, emphasizing whatever concepts they need support with; letter recognition, letter naming, or letter sounds.
  • Using small letter tiles or letter cubes, cover up each letter with its matching piece.

Click to gain access to our subscriber resource library and start reinforcing your child’s letter knowledge today!

Want to save this post for later?

Pin “Find the Letter Alphabet Pages – Fun and Easy ABC Learning for Kids” to your favorite Pinterest board!

 

how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabethow to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabethow to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Free Printable Alphabet Flash Cards (Plus 15 Fun and Easy Ways to Use Them)

Free Printable Alphabet Flash Cards (Plus 15 Fun and Easy Ways to Use Them)

Alphabet flash cards can be powerful, versatile tools for teaching the alphabet. Keep reading and watch the videos to discover fifteen fun and easy ways to use flash cards to help children learn the alphabet. You can use any flash cards for these activities. In the videos I use all four sets of the free printable alphabet flash cards found in our subscriber resource library. I printed them, mounted them on construction paper and laminated them.


This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through an affiliate link, A Family of Readers earns a small commission.

Tips

  • Keep it light and fun. Try out activities to discover which ones your child enjoys the most.
  • For any of these activities, start with a limited number of cards and work up to using a larger set.
  • As you prepare a game or activity, choose a mix of letters your child knows well with a few that they are working on.
  • Keep activities and games non-competitive.
  • Consider laminating your alphabet cards to make them sturdier.

Introduction

Memory or Concentration

Choose two sets alphabet flash cards you want to work with. Create 3-5 matched sets, mix them up and place them face down in rows. Take turns flipping over two cards. If the two cards match, leave them face up. If the two cards don’t match, turn them back over. Keep playing until all the cards have been matched in pairs and are face up.

Some variations allow the person who turned over matching cards to keep them. For young children, I prefer Memory to be a non-competitive activity, rather than a competitive game, so we leave the matching cards face up.

Memory/Concentration

 

Bingo

To play bingo with alphabet flash cards, create a “bingo” board. Place the cards face up. Use small items such as puffballs or Lego pieces as markers. You can call out the names of letters or the sounds of letters. Or use the picture cards and ask your child to place a marker on the letter for the sound they hear at the beginning of that word.

Bingo

SlapJack

For alphabet SlapJack, use the vowels as the “jacks.” Place a set of alphabet cards face down in a pile and turn them over one at a time. Decide with your child if each card is a consonant or a vowel. When a vowel comes up, the first person to place their hand on top of the card “wins.” Instead of having the vowels be the “jacks,” you can use the letters in your child’s name.

Slapjack

Go Fish

The object of the game is to collect matched pairs of cards. Choose two sets of alphabet flash cards and organize them into matched pairs. Choose a limited number of pairs to create a playing deck. For example, you could start with ten pairs to create a deck of 20 cards.

Each player receives five cards. With older children you can keep the cards secret. When I play this with younger children, we lay our cards face up so that I can help them create pairs. The remaining cards are spread out face down between the players.

If a player has two cards that match, they set those cards aside, face up.

Player One then looks at the cards they have, and asks Player Two for a card that will create a pair. “Do you have the letter ‘m’? If Player Two has the requested card, they give it to Player One, who sets aside the matched pair. Player One goes again until they do not get the card they asked for.

If Player Two does not have the requested card, they say “GO FISH!” and Player One chooses a card from the face down cards. If it is the card they wanted, they create the pair and then go again. If it is not the card they asked for, their turn is over.

The game ends when either player runs out of cards or the cards in the middle are gone. The “winner” is the person who has the most pairs.

Old Maid

The object of the game is to collect and discard matched pairs, and not get left holding the “Old Maid.” To play Old Maid, choose two sets of alphabet flash cards and organize them into matched pairs. Choose a limited number of pairs to create a playing deck. Then add a letter on its own. This card is the “Old Maid.”

Place all of the cards face down. Players sort their cards and set aside any matched pairs. To start the game, Player One keeps their cards face down and offers them to Player Two. Player Two chooses one card without seeing it.

If it makes a pair with a card they have in their hand, they set the pair aside. If not, they keep the card. Then, it is their turn to offer their cards face down to Player One. The game ends when both players have paired up all of their cards. The player who is left with the Old Maid “loses.”

Create a Game Board

Use alphabet cards to create a path in whatever shape you like. In the video I made a grid, but with more space you can create curves. Take turns rolling dice and moving markers. Depending on your child’s needs, decide what to do once you land on a card. Say the letter name? Provide the letter sound? In the video I do both, but this activity is so flexible. Modify it as needed to match your family’s needs.

Create your own game board

I Spy

“I Spy” is a simple, versatile activity with flexible guidelines.  Choose a set of alphabet cards and lay them out. With letter cards you could say “I spy lowercase b.” Or, “I spy the letter for the /b/ sound. Then have your child point to the card that matches what you “spied.”

With alphabet picture cards you might say “I spy a picture that starts with the letter b,” or “I spy a picture that starts with the /b/ sound.”

Alphabet Scavenger Hunt

Place/prop alphabet cards next to objects in your home that start with that letter. When your child finds a card, have them tell you the letter name and letter sound, and the name of the object.

Bean Bag Toss

Arrange alphabet flash cards in a group on the floor. Have your child toss a bean bag on to the cards. Whatever card the bean bag lands on, have your child provide the letter name, letter sound, or a word that starts with that letter.

Hopscotch

Arrange alphabet flash cards in a line on the floor. Have your child hop or jump from letter to letter, next to the cards (rather than on top of them like traditional hopscotch.) At they land next to each card, have them say the letter name, letter sound, or a word that starts with that letter.

Which One Does Not Belong?

Choose three lowercase letter cards and one uppercase letter card. Help your child figure out which card is doesn’t belong with the others and why. You can do this activity with consonants and vowels, or letters with curved shapes and letters with straight lines.

What’s Missing?

Arrange a set of alphabet flash cards in alphabetical order. Then remove a few and scoot the remaining cards close together. Help your child figure out which letters are missing. Keep an alphabet chart handy to use as a reference.

Sort by Letter Shape

Sort a set of lowercase letter cards by shape. “Monkey” letters have tails, “giraffe” letters are tall, and “chicken” letters are short. You can also sort by letters that have curved lines and letters that have straight lines.

Brainstorm Words

Pick a card and think of as many words as possible that start with that sound. This is a fun activity to play as a family during dinner or on car rides.

Practice Letter Formation

Teach your child to trace letter shapes with their finger. If you have laminated your cards, your child can trace with a crayon or dry erase marker.

 

Our free printable Alphabet Flash Cards provide a ton of fun and easy opportunities to help children learn the alphabet. Which activity or game will you try first? Let us know how it went in the comments section below.

 

Want to save this post for later? Pin “Free Printable Alphabet Flash Cards” to your favorite Pinterest board.

Free Printable Alphabet Flash Cards and 15 Fun and Easy Ways to Use Them Free Printable Alphabet Flash Cards and 15 Fun and Easy Ways to Use Them

 



Free Alphabet Printables (Where to Find the Best Alphabet Resources for FREE)

Free Alphabet Printables (Where to Find the Best Alphabet Resources for FREE)

I love teaching the alphabet, and the free alphabet printables available from these amazing blogs and websites are incredible. Whether you are homeschooling or just looking to enrich at home, I promise that in this post you’ll find what you need to make teaching the alphabet easy and fun.

This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through an affiliate link, I earn a small commission.

 

This Reading Mama

how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

This Reading Mama has a website that is jam-packed with valuable information about teaching reading and writing to kids ages birth to elementary school. Look for This Reading Mama’s beautiful free Alphabet Printables here. Most of the resources offered by This Reading Mama are free, and she plans to keep it that way! I love this website so much. If you had the time, you could read her blog posts and download her free resources and be well equipped to teach reading and writing without buying anything at all. (To save you time, she has bundled some of her free resources together and sells them at completely reasonable prices. But still, tons of printables are available for free.)

 

 

This Reading Mama Video Presentation

 

The Measured Mom

how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

The Measured Mom is another blogger who totally knows her stuff, and creates alphabet printable worksheets and activities that are spot-on. Find The Measured Mom’s free Alphabet Printables here. Like This Reading Mama, she sells bundles of her freebies for your convenience, but there is plenty available for free. Her blog provides valuable information for parents and teachers, explaining how we should teach reading, writing, spelling and math, and why. Another free resource you’ll find at The Measured Mom is extensive book lists for kids. No matter what type of book you’re looking for, you’re sure to find what you need on one of these lists.

 

 

 

The Measured Mom Video Presentation

 

Totschooling

how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

Totschooling is a website that focuses almost exclusively on free printables in every subject area imaginable. Find Totschooling free Alphabet Printables here. What struck me about Totschooling’s printables is their bright color and engaging design. I look at them and think “oh, I want that for my students.” Believe me, these printables are gorgeous in addition to being well-crafted for instruction. Although most printables are free, you can find the Totschooling store here.

 

 

 

Totschooling Video Presentation

 

Prekinders

how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

PreKinders is a website that theoretically caters to PreKinder teachers, but these high quality resources are perfect for preschool, PreK or Kindergarten. Click here for free Alphabet Printables from PreKinders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PreKinders Video Presentation

 

Fun Learning For Kids

how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

Fun Learning for Kids offers a blog with excellent information about teaching all subjects, with an emphasis on alphabet activities. Find free Alphabet Printables from Fun Learning for Kids here. These are wonderful printables with great activities for teaching the alphabet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fun Learning for Kids Video Presentation

 

BONUS TIP – Teachers Pay Teachers

Follow this link at Teachers Pay Teachers. If the link doesn’t work, or you want to do your own search, follow these steps: on Teachers Pay Teachers, search for “alphabet.” When the page comes up, on the left hand side scroll down to “Prices” and click “free.”  When I did this I came up with 9,283 results!

 

Free and Fabulous

After 25 years of teaching, I marvel at the diverse, top-quality teaching resources that are so readily available to us now. There are so many fabulous free alphabet printables out there, and I hope this post helps you find just what you need.

Let me know in the comments – what alphabet printables did you discover and download?

 

Want to remember this post for later?

Pin “Free Alphabet Printables” to your favorite Pinterest board.

 

  Click through to discover the best FREE alphabet printables available on the internet. You'll find just what you need to make it easy and fun for your child to learn the alphabet! Click through to discover the best FREE alphabet printables available on the internet. You'll find just what you need to make it easy and fun for your child to learn the alphabet! Click through to discover the best FREE alphabet printables available on the internet. You'll find just what you need to make it easy and fun for your child to learn the alphabet!

 



Toys and Games That Teach the Alphabet

Toys and Games That Teach the Alphabet

This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through an affiliate link, A Family of Readers earns a small commission.

 

Toys and Games That Teach the Alphabet – In this post, I’ve curated a list of games and toys that make learning the alphabet easy and fun for everyone. Note: please check recommended ages and make sure products are appropriate and safe for your little ones.

 

Bath Letters and Numbers

Foam Bath Letters and Numbers by Little Tykes help you create a literacy-rich learning environment everywhere in your home! They’re a great way to make alphabet learning part of bath-time fun.

how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

Alphabet Bean Bags

Alphabet Bean Bags are a versatile tool for reinforcing alphabet knowledge in a hands-on, kinesthetic way. They come with an activity guide with directions for hands-on alphabet games. Measuring 2.75″ by 2.75″, these felt beanbags are lightweight and easy for young children to handle.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

Alphabet Cookies

These cute 2″ Alphabet Cookies help reinforce letter recognition and beginning sounds, plus CVC words and vocabulary. They come in a sturdy jar with directions for four different games. You get the full alphabet plus extras of the letters that are used more often. Aside from the games that are included, you could use these for matching games, sorting games and bingo markers!how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

Melissa & Doug Deluxe Wooden ABC/123 Blocks Set

This Melissa & Doug Deluxe Wooden ABC/123 Blocks Set is a classic.  The 1″ blocks are carved or printed with letters, numbers and pictures.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

Jumbo ABC-123 Rug with Game Cards

This Jumbo ABC-123 Play Rug by Melissa & Doug can be used as decor in a kids’ room and as a game! It comes with 36 over-sized double-sided playing cards to match to the letters and numbers on the rug. It’s highly durable with a nonstick rubber backing. Best of all, there’s plenty of room for more than one child to play at a time.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

Learning Resources Alphabet Marks The Spot Floor Mat

The Alphabet Marks The Spot Floor Mat is one of the the best ways I’ve found to let kids use gross motor skills and movement to learn the alphabet. It’s perfect for rainy or snowy days. Although the rug above is awesome, this mat is great because it can be stored away when not in use.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

LEGO DUPLO Play with Letters

The LEGO DUPLO Play with Letters set is a versatile choice that offers endless opportunities for hands-on alphabet learning.

how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

Alphabet Soft Foam Blocks

These lightweight 5.5″ Alphabet Soft Foam Blocks are printed with uppercase letters. They provide opportunities for gross motor skill activities to build letter recognition.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

Alphabet Robot Transformer Action Figure Autobots

What a creative way for kids to work with the alphabet! These Alphabet Robot Transformer Action Figure Autobots are irresistible manipulatives for learning the alphabet.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

Alphabet Soup Sorters

Alphabet Soup Sorters offer plenty of opportunities for sorting and matching to learn letters and sounds. Each can holds little cardboard photos of items that start with that letter, plus the letters themselves. These are great for imaginative play as well as more structured activities.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

Alphabet Dinosaurs

These Alphabet Dinosaurs help kids learn lowercase and uppercase letters while developing fine motor strength and dexterity.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

Alphabet Memory Game

This Alphabet Memory Game is a terrific way to build lowercase and uppercase letter recognition and practice letter sounds. Add this to family game night!

how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

Alphabet Go Fish Letter Matching Card Game

Alphabet Go Fish is a classic that every child should play! Add this to family game night for extra practice with letters and sounds.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

Alphabet Bingo! Letter Learning Game for Kids

Alphabet Bingo is another classic for your game shelf. Instead of using a “caller” to say letters, this game has players reach into a bag and pull out a letter token, then check for a match.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

The manufacturer of these two games, Peaceable Kingdom, has a whole line of themed, educational games for kids. They’re awesome.

 

Alphabet Island – A Letter & Sounds Game

Alphabet Island – A Letter & Sounds Game provides practice matching lowercase and uppercase letters, and matching uppercase letters to letter sounds.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

Alphabet Slap Jack

I love these Alphabet Slap Jack cards for so many reasons. They are the size of a deck of standard playing cards and perfect to drop into your purse or keep in the car. Uppercase and lowercase letters are on separate cards, which adds tons of flexibility in playing games (directions included). The vowel cards feature pictures with the short vowel sound, which is much more useful than the long vowel sound. These are perfect for families on the go!how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

Melissa & Doug ABC-123 Abacus

The little spinning tiles on this Melissa & Doug ABC-123 Abacus are so appealing to kids. This toy develops hand-eye coordination while providing practice with sounds and uppercase letters.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

Sit-to-Stand Alphabet Train

V-tech’s Sit-to-Stand Alphabet Train is designed for your youngest learners, ages 1 to 3. It can be used as a push toy, a riding toy, or for floor play.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

Alphabet Phonics Bus

Oh my goodness, my parents gave this LeapFrog Alphabet Phonics Bus to my son 20 years ago! My kids spent endless hours intently pushing those letter buttons to see what sounds they would make. This updated version has four modes – letters, animals, games, and music. Each mode integrates letters and sounds in some way.LeapFrog Alphabet Phonics Bus

 

Spinning Lights Learning Hippo

Also by Vtech, this Spinning Lights Learning Hippo helps kids learn numbers in addition to the alphabet. Pull the bird “handle” down to learn about letters, sounds, objects, and animals. Press the ABC button to sing along to the alphabet song.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

AlphaPup Toy

The AlphaPup Toy by Vtech is a classic pull toy for toddlers and preschoolers. When your little one pulls AlphaPup along by the leash, 3 different educational songs play. Push the colorful stripes on AlphaPup’s sweater to hear letters and sounds. This cute toy comes in green or purple/pink.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

Deluxe Letters and Numbers Wooden Stamp Set

This Deluxe Letters and Numbers Wooden Stamp Set by Melissa & Doug is a fantastic addition to any family’s arts and crafts cupboard. It comes with an alphabet and numbers activity pad.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

Alphabet Train Lacing Beads

Also by Melissa & Doug, Alphabet Train Lacing Beads develop fine motor dexterity while helping kids learn letters and sounds. These wooden “beads” can be used for matching, sorting, sequencing and spelling.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

 

Alphabet Wooden Lacing Cards

These Alphabet Wooden Lacing Cards are old fashioned lacing cards themed with alphabet letters and matching images. Each lacing card features an uppercase and lowercase letter on one side with a matching picture on the other. They’re great for exposure to letters and sounds while kids are busy developing fine motor skills and dexterity.how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet
You’re sure to find something on this list that will boost your child’s alphabet knowledge and help create a culture of reading and literacy in your home. What toys or games will your add to your family’s collection? Let me know in the comments!

 

Want to save this post for later?

Pin “Toys and Games That Teach the Alphabet” to your favorite Pinterest board.

alphabet games and toys that teach the alphabet

 

 

How to Teach the Alphabet (And Make it Easy and Fun!)

How to Teach the Alphabet (And Make it Easy and Fun!)

How to teach the alphabet is the often the first thing parents wonder about when they want to start developing pre-reading skills in their children. And it’s a great place to start!

(To learn everything you need to know about developing reading readiness skills in your child, take my online digital course for parents, How to Raise a Reader – Reading Readiness Edition.)

This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through an affiliate link, A Family of Readers earns a small commission.

How to Teach the Alphabet to Kids. | reading readiness | preschool | kindergarten | learning to read |Why is Teaching the Alphabet Such a Great Place to Start?

For the most part, teaching kids the alphabet is straightforward and easy. It’s an area in which parents generally feel confident – we all know the alphabet song, right? 

And materials are easy to find – alphabet books, magnetic letters, alphabet toys and alphabet puzzles are readily available on Amazon, and at Target, Walmart and dollar stores.

Best of all, it’s FUN.

No matter what age your child is (birth to late Kindergarten), I believe that you should be “teaching” the alphabet, at least at some level. (Yes, I know this is a controversial statement, but stay with me here.)

“Teaching” the alphabet to kids looks and sounds very different depending upon the ages of the children.

 

How to Introduce the Alphabet to Babies – Yes, Babies! how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

For babies, it’s all about low-key, natural exposure. Make the alphabet an ordinary, expected part of your home environment and daily routine.

Think about this – nursery decor, books, and toys for babies are themed with basic concepts such as colors, shapes, animals, foods, nursery rhymes, etc. Make sure that the alphabet is included in there somewhere, too.

My favorite way to do this is by reading aloud lots of alphabet books. Just as you would point out objects in a book when you are reading to a baby – “Look, there’s the elephant,” – you can point out letters just as naturally. You might say “I see the letter B,” while you point to it, and then keep moving right along through the book.

I also like to have a simple, clear alphabet chart or poster as decor in a nursery.  And be sure to include the alphabet song in your repertoire of lullabies.

I want to be very clear here. You are NOT teaching the alphabet, per se. You are making it an ordinary part of your home environment and family culture. The goal is to make the alphabet a natural part of the background in your baby’s life.

 

Helping Toddlers Learn the Alphabet

Take a look at that heading just above – notice that I used the term “learn” as opposed to “teach.” With toddlers, it’s all about helping them LEARN the alphabet, as opposed to TEACHING them the alphabet.

To help younger toddlers learn the alphabet, start casually building on the exposure you established during babyhood. This is the time to add a few alphabet toys to your child’s toy box.

how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabetBe more purposeful when reading alphabet books. Transition from telling the name of a letter to inviting your toddler to point to a letter – “Where is the B? Show me the letter B.” If they can’t, point to the letter and say, “There’s the B!” Keep it fun, brief, and low-key.

Use your home’s alphabet chart in this same way. “Read” it together once each day, perhaps as part of the bedtime routine.

Toddlers are usually able to point to letters before they can say the names of the letters. Once you notice that your little one can say the names of some letters, start asking, “What is this letter?” as you point. If they have trouble, say it yourself and encourage them to repeat it. Keep it conversational, and don’t ever let it sound like a demand or a test.

 

If Kids Can Learn That a Cow Says “Moo,” They Can Learn That the /b/ Sound Goes With the Letter B

For older toddlers who seem ready, you can repeat this process with letter sounds. Always start by modeling – “That’s the letter B. /b/, /b, /b/.” When the time seems right, move on to prompting “What sound does B make?” Again, if they have any trouble, say it yourself and encourage them to repeat it. Keep it as casual as any other conversation you share with your toddler.

The goal is for your toddler to learn to identify letters by name and know their sounds in the same way that the rest of their language is developing – naturally, and on their own personal timeline.

 

Tools for Learning the Alphabet

Toddler-hood is the time to introduce magnetic letters and foam letters for the bathtub. Keep a set of jumbo magnetic letters on the fridge and draw attention to them in the same way you do with alphabet books. I like to have uppercase magnetic letters and lowercase magnetic letters.

Use magnetic letters to form your child’s name, and point it out to them every day. This is a great way to start developing the concept that letters form words, which convey meaning. 

Toddlers love to play with jumbo magnetic letters, stacking them, rearranging them on the fridge, and taking them in and out of containers. Continue modeling by commenting casually – “You’re putting the letter M in the tub, aren’t you?” Then move along to inviting participation – “Can you hand me the letter W?” You can make these same activities a part of your child’s bath-time by adding foam letters to your collection of bath toys. Early on in your child’s journey to learning the alphabet, magnetic letters should be more of a toy, not a formal learning tool. It won’t be long before you’re using them to reinforce letter sounds and early spelling skills.

If your older toddler seems ready, do the same sort of activity with sounds.

how to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabetAlong with plush toys, blocks, play vehicles and dolls, be sure to include alphabet puzzles and alphabet games in your child’s toy box. This is another way to make letters and sounds a natural part of your home’s culture and environment.

Alphabet puzzles help your child develop fine motor, visual discrimination and problem-solving skills while physically touching and exploring the letters of the alphabet. Work on these together at first, until your child has built some success in fitting the letters back into their spaces. Try offering one letter puzzle piece at a time, and pointing to the general area of the puzzle frame where it can be found. Offer clues – “Can you find the picture of the ball, for the letter B?” 

 

Teaching the Alphabet to Preschoolers

Up until around age three, I recommend keeping letter and sound activities informal and casual. At around age three, as kids move into the preschool years, they should interact with letters and sounds in a more purposeful way. Start including 10-15 minutes of more structured (but still fun!) alphabet activities in your daily routine.

Continue modeling, especially with sounds, but invite your child to actively participate more often. In addition to taking advantage of learning opportunities as they come up, start intentionally creating fun teaching opportunities. Add a few alphabet games to your home and establish a weekly family game night. Suggest doing an alphabet puzzle together, and then comment on or ask your child to identify most of the letters rather than just a few. Have your child watch LeapFrog’s Letter Factory while you are cooking dinner. (It’s an incredibly effective way to reinforce letters and sounds.)

 

Flashcards Can Be Fantastichow to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

While I don’t recommend using flashcards to “drill” your preschooler, they are invaluable for playing games and creating alphabet activities. A great physical activity is to have your child lay alphabet flashcards out on the floor in order, and then read them aloud, walking or crawling along the line of cards.

Or, grab your tub of magnetic letters and have your preschooler place each one on top of its matching flashcard. You can tape flashcards around the house and send your child on a treasure hunt to see how many letters they can find.

Buy two of the same sets and use them for playing matching games or “concentration.” Play bingo by pulling a few flashcards from one set to create a bingo card, and using the other set for letters to “call.” With two sets, you can even play a limited version of “Go Fish.”

Once each day, point to each card in order from left to right and “read” the card with your child. This activity is a great addition to your bedtime story routine. For babies and toddlers, just say the name of the letter and the name of the picture. For preschoolers and Kindergartners, say the name of the letter, the name of the picture, and the sound.

 

Invest in an Excellent Alphabet Curriculumalphabet activities for kids

If you are homeschooling, or you want to provide activities in a more systematic way, invest in a high-quality alphabet curriculum. This Reading Mama has an unbelievable, affordable product called the “Learning the Alphabet Bundle.” It’s jam-packed with powerful hands-on activities for learning letters and letter sounds. To get the most bang for your buck, I recommend purchasing a downloadable bundle product such as this rather than just picking up alphabet workbooks here and there. You’ll receive many more activities to choose from, and you can download and print out exactly what your child needs.

Any of the activities the Learning the Alphabet Bundle would be great for that 10-15 minutes of structured alphabet learning time that I recommend for preschoolers. When we provide engaging activities like these, kids learn much more easily and quickly. I guarantee there is something in this bundle that your child will fall in love with, which will totally supercharge their alphabet learning!

 

Developing Deep Letter Knowledgehow to teach your child to recognize the letters of the alphabet

In order to become a skilled, fluent reader and writer, your child needs to develop deep letter knowledge. And the time to do this is during Pre-K and the beginning of Kindergarten. If you haven’t started using a curriculum like the “Learning the Alphabet Bundle,” now is definitely the time to add 10-15 minutes of structured alphabet activities to your child’s day.

Having deep letter knowledge means that your child can:

  • Readily identify all lowercase and uppercase letters by name.
  • Write each lowercase and uppercase letter.
  • Hear a vowel or consonant sound and immediately know which letter represents it.
  • Look at a letter and articulate the sound it makes.

True mastery of these four skills takes time – from informal babyhood exposure to direct instruction during Pre-K and Kindergarten. It takes steady, age-appropriate practice and review at the same time your child is developing other reading readiness skills.

Whether you are homeschooling or reinforcing what your child learns in preschool, Pre-K or Kindergarten, isn’t it wonderful that you can set your child up for success in learning to read by something as simple as teaching the alphabet? You’ll never regret taking advantage of this amazing power and precious opportunity.

 

Want to remember this post for later?

Pin “How to Teach the Alphabet” to your favorite Pinterest board. 

 

Alphabet activities - worksheets, games, puzzles, hands-on activities.How to develop "deep letter knowledge" in your Kindergartner. Learn how to teach the alphabet to your baby. Learn how to teach the alphabet to your toddler.